Are You Claiming Tax Back For Repairs To Your Rental House?

Are you paying too much tax on your rental income?

Many landlords are aware that they can claim certain tax expenses on their rental properties.  These include mortgage interest, lettings agent’s fees, accountants’ fees, council tax and buildings and contents insurance.

However, it is also possible to claim the cost of maintenance and repairs to your rental property.  Our guide explains what you can, and cannot, claim.

Repairs

All properties need repairs from time to time.  You may have to call in a qualified plumber to repair a fault to the boiler, repair a broken window or fix the floorboards.  Any essential repairs to the property are classed as a tax expense and you can deduct these from your rental income when you calculate how much tax is due.

Make sure you keep a record of the cost of these repairs.  Whilst they will be totalled when you complete your self assessment tax return, when you claim tax back for repairs to a rental house you may be asked to provide evidence of the work.

General services

It is also possible to claim tax expenses relating to services that are provided to the property.  For example, services such as cleaning or gardening are classes as an allowable expense and you can claim these accordingly.

Maintenance

Every property needs general maintenance from time to time.  You may find that you have to paint the interior or exterior of the property, creosote the garden fences or retile the bathroom.

Sometimes the maintenance that is needed can be more significant, such as a new window or door or replacing the conservatory.

Any general maintenance that you do to the property is classes as an allowable expense.  However, you need to be sure that the work you are carrying out is maintenance and repairs and not an ‘improvement’.

Improvements

You are not allowed to claim the expenses of making improvements to your rental property.  HMRC consider an ‘improvement’ to increase the value of the property, and so will not allow you to claim the cost.

For example, if you wanted to replace an old, leaking conservatory, this would probably count as a ‘repair’.  However, if you wanted to add a conservatory to the house, this would be classed as an ‘improvement’.

Sometimes there is a fine line between repairs and improvements.  Upgrading windows when you are repairing them (from wooden to uPVC, for example) may still be classed as an ‘improvement’.  It is always worth checking first with HMRC to determine whether the work you are undertaking can be claimed against your rental income for tax purposes.

14 comments

  1. Akan says:

    Having carried out the repairs to the house that I am renting out myself – what hourly rate should I claim?

  2. margaret watkins says:

    i just want to know how much i can claim back on my gas and elec plus phone when working from home per week for self employment

  3. Bavani Arun says:

    If I do any repair and maintenance work myself on my own rental property, can I claim expenses for my time / work? Are there any other ways of reducing my tax liability by doing this work myself?

    Thanks.

  4. rachel fryer says:

    Hi

    Can you also count rent protection insurance against tax?

  5. valerie says:

    Hi.I might have to help with my sick mum and I am planning to rent my house out for a year and use the money to pay for the rent of the place I will be staying at. However Ive been told this will count as income and the tax man will not care if I still have to pay for a roof over my head. Is this right and how much tax will I pay? My only other income is my state pension.

  6. Scott says:

    My tenant is unable to use the gravel driveway at the rental property. The drive is on a incline and the gravel surface is very slippery so parking is difficult. There could be the potential for the car to slip onto the pavement. Would it be possible to claim back the cost of replacing gravel for concrete?

    as you say there is often a fine line between repairs and improvements and it is best to contact HMRC to discuss further – any idea which department I am suppose to speak to?!

  7. Dr FA Prichard says:

    can a landlord claim for installing central heating

  8. Simon Brister says:

    Rental property – repairs. Am I right that you cannot claim for repairs which are done in the first 12 months of ownership and instead need to add these to your acquisition costs for CGT purposes – or has that rule changed?

  9. Martin Barawitzka says:

    If I do any repair and maintenance work myself on my own rental property can I claim travelling expenses to the property and expenses for my time / work? Are there any other ways of reducing my tax liability by doing this work myself?

    Thanks in advance.

    Martin Barawitzka

  10. Nigel says:

    paid £15,000 in maintentence, tax for this year £7,000, can I claim back tax of the remaining sum in the following tax year?

  11. Lee says:

    What if I repair and maintain my house myself

  12. Chris Sugarhood says:

    Can you claim say British Gas HomeCare service against tax

  13. Chris Sugarhood says:

    Can you claim say British Gas HomeCare service against tax

  14. Chris Sugarhood says:

    Can you claim say British Gas HomeCare service against tax

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